CAMBRIDGE IELTS 11 READING – TEST 2 – ANSWERS

CAMBRIDGE IELTS 11 READING – TEST 2 – ANSWERS

CAMBRIDGE IELTS 11 – TEST 2 – PASSAGE 1

Paragraph 1:  On 19 July, 1545…..

Paragraph 2:  The Mary Rose came to rest….

Paragraph 3:  Then, on 16 June 1836….

Paragraph 4:  The Mary Rose then faded….

Paragraph 5:  Further excavations revealed….

Paragraph 6:  An important factor….

 

  1. There is some doubt about what caused the Mary Rose to sink

Keywords: doubt, sink

In the first paragraph, the writer says that “Accountsof what happened to the shipvary: while witnesses agree that she was not hit by the French, some maintain that she was outdated, overladen and sailing too low in the water, others that she was by undisciplined crew.”

 

  • what caused the Mary Rose to sink=accounts of what happened to the ship

=>ANSWER: TRUE

 

  1. The Mary Rose was the only ship to sink in the battle of 19 July 1545

Keywords: the only ship, sink, 19 July 1545

In the first paragraph, the writer states that “Among the English vessels was a warship by the name of Mary Rose” but he does not mention whether the Mary Rose was the only ship to sink in the battle. So, the statement

is NOT GIVEN.

=>ANSWER: NOT GIVEN

 

  1. Most of one side of the Mary Rose lay undamaged under the sea.

Keywords: one side, undamaged, under the sea

In  the  second  paragraph,  the  writer  indicates  that  “Because  of  the  way  the  ship  sank,  nearly  all  of  the starboard half survived intact.”

 

  • most of=nearly all of
  • one side of the Mary Rose=the starboard half

 

  • undamaged=intact

=> ANSWER: TRUE

 

  1. Alexander McKee knew that the wreck would contain many valuable historical objects.

Keywords: valuable historical objects, Alexander McKee

In paragraph 5, the writer argues that “McKee and his team now knew for certain that they had found the wreck, but were as yet unaware that it also housed a treasure trove of beautifully preserved artefacts.”This means that Alexander McKee did not know that the wreck would contain many valuable historical objects.

  • contain=house

 

  • many valuable historical objects ~ a treasure trove of beautifully preseved artefacts

=> ANSWER: FALSE

 



  1. A search for the Mary Rose was launched

In paragraph 4, the writer says that “But in 1965, military historian and amateur diver Alexander McKee, in conjunction with the British Sub-Aqua Club, initiated a project called „Solent Ships‟.   While on paper this was a plan to examine a number of known wrecks in the Solent, what McKee really hoped for was to find the Mary Rose.”

  • launched=initiated

=>ANSWER: C

 

  1. One person‟s exploration of the Mary Rose site stopped.

In paragraph 3 and 4, the writer argues that “Exploring further, he uncovered several other timbers and a bronze gun. Deane continued diving on the site intermittently until 1840, recovering several more guns, two bows, various timbers, part of a pump and various other small finds. The Mary Rose then faded into obscurity for another hundred years.” This means that in 1840, Deane‟s exploration of the Mary Rose site stopped.

=>ANSWER: B

 

  1. It was agreed that the hull of the Mary Rose should be raised.

In paragraph 5, the writer indicates that “While the original aim was to raise the hull if at all feasible, the operation was not giventhe go-aheaduntilJanuary 1982, when all the necessary information was available.”

  • agreed=given the go-ahead

=>ANSWER: G

 

  1. The site of the Mary Rose was found by chance

In  paragraph  3,  “Then,  on  16  June  1836,  some  fishermen  in  the  Solent  found  that  their  equipment  was caught on an underwater obstruction, which turned out to be the Mary Rose.”

=>ANSWER: A

 



9-13. Raising the hull of the Mary Rose: Stages one and two.

  1. …..attached to hull by wires

In the last paragraph, the writer says that “The hull was attached to a lifting framevia a network of bolts and lifting wires.”

  • by=via

=>ANSWER: lifting frame

 

10…… to prevent hull being sucked into mud

In the last paragraph, the writer says that “The problem of the hull being sucked back downwards into the mud was overcome by using 12 hydraulic jacks.”

=>ANWER: hydraulic jacks

 

  1. legs are placed into…..

In  the  last  paragraph,  the  writer  says  that  “This  required  precise  positioning  to  locate  the  legs  into  the „stabbing guides‟ of the lifting cradle.”

  • place=locate

=> ANSWER: stabbing guides

 

  1. hull is lowered into…..

Also, in the last paragraph, the writer says that “In this stage, the lifting frame was fixed to a hook attached to a crane, and the hull was lifted completely clear of the seabed and transferred underwater into the lifting cradle.”

  • lowered into ~ transferred underwater into

=>ANSWER: lifting cradle

 

13….. used as extra protection for the hull.

Also,  in  the  last  paragraph,  the  writer  says  that  “The  lifting  cradle  was  designed  to  fit  the  hull  using archaeological survey drawings, and was fitted with airbags to provide additional cushioning for the hull‟s delicate timber framework.”

  • extra protection=additional cushioning

=>ANSWER: air bags

 



CAMBRIDGE IELTS 11 – TEST 2 – PASSAGE 2

 

  1. Paragraph A

In  this  paragraph, the author  writes about  Easter  Island and the moai. He says  that  “The  identity of  the moai  builders  was  in  doubt  until  well  into  the  twentieth  century.”  Then,  he  explains  some  people‟s assumptions of how the Moai were built. The paragraph ends by noting that modern science has  definitively proved the moai builders were Polynesians”. So, the correct heading for this paragraph is an undisputed answer to a question about the moai.

  • an undisputed answer to a question=definitively proved

=>ANSWER: ii

 

  1. Paragraph B

In this paragraph, the writer indicates that “When the islanders (the Rapanui people) cleared the forests for firewood  and  farming,  the  forests  didn‟t  grow  back.  As  trees  became  scarce  and  they  could  no  longer construct wooden canoes for fishing, they ate birds. Soil erosion decreased their crop yields.” This led to the collapse of their isolated civilisation. So, the correct heading of this paragraph is diminishing food resources.

=>ANSWER: ix

 

  1. Paragraph C

In this paragraph, the writer emphasizes that “The moai accelerated the  self-destruction.” To support this idea, the writer lists what the moai did, such as competing by building ever bigger figures, laying the moai on wooden sledges, hauling over log rails, clearing land. So, the correct idea of this paragraph is how the statues made a situation worse

  • the statues=the moai

 

  • made a situation worse=accelerated the self-destruction

=>ANSWER: viii

 

  1. Paragraph D

In this paragraph, “archaeological excavations indicate that the Rapanui went to heroic  efforts to protect the resources of  their  wind-lashed,  infertile fields.  They  built  thousands  of  circular  stone windbreaks  and gardened inside them, and used broken volcanic rocks to keep the soil moist.” Then, the writer concludes that “In short, the prehistoric Rapanui were pioneers of sustainable farming.”So, The correct heading of this paragraph is evidence of innovation environment management practices.

=>ANSWER: i

 

18.Paragraph E.

This  paragraph  is  about  some  archaeological  evidence  of  how  the  moai  were  moved,  which  “backs  up Rapanui folklore”: “Recent experiments indicate that as few as 18 people could, with three strong ropes and a bit of practice, easily manoeuvre a 1,000 kg moai replica a few hundred metres.”So, the correct heading for this paragraph is a theory which supports the local belief.

  • support=back up

 

  • the folklore=the local belief

=>ANSWER: iv

 



  1. Paragraph F

In this paragraph, the writer mentions some damage to the island that was not caused by the Rapanui, such as the rats (the rats arrived along with the settlers, and in a few years, hunt and Lipo calculate, they would have overrun the island) and “the arrival of the Europeans who introduced deadly diseases to which islanders had no immunity”. Hunt and Lippo claim that the Rapanui “were not wholly responsible for the loss of the island‟s trees”.  So, the correct heading for this paragraph is destruction outside the inhabitants‟ control.

=>ANSWER: vii

 

  1. Paragraph G

In this paragraph, the writer mentions two points of view of the Rapanui. While Hunt and Lipo shared the vision  that  the  moai  builders  were  peaceful  and  ingenious,  another  assumption  was  that  the  Rapanui  “were reckless destroyers ruining their own environment and society.” So, the correct heading for this paragraph is two opposing views about the Rapanui people.

  • view=vision

=>ANSWER: vi

 

21-24. Jared Diamond‟s View

  1. Diamond believes that the Polynesian settlers on Rapa Nui destroyed its forests, cutting down its trees for fuel and clearing land for…..

Keywords: the Polynesian settlers, clearing land for, Jared Diamond

In  paragraph B, the writer argues  that  “US scientist  Jared Diamond  believes  that  the Rapanui  people  – descendants  of  Polynesian  settlers  –  wrecked  their  own  environment.  They  had  unfortunately  settled  on  an extremely fragile island – dry, cool, and too remote to be properly fertilised by windblown volcanic ash. When

islanders cleared the forests for firewood and farming, the forests didn‟t grow back.” In the next paragraph, he says “To feed the people, even more land had to be cleared.”

=> ANSWER: 21: farming

 

22-23. When the islanders were no longer able to build the 22….. they needed to go fishing, they began using the island‟s 23……

Keywords: no longer, build, fishing

In paragraph B, the writer says that “As trees became scarce and they could no longer construct wooden canoes for fishing, they ate birds.

  • build=construct

=>ANSWER: 22.canoes

                      23.birds

 



  1. Diamond  also  claims  that  the  moai  were  built  to  show  the  power  of  the  island‟s  chieftains,  and  that themethods of transporting the statues needed not only a great number of people, but also a great deal of…..

Keywords: transporting the statues, a great deal of

In paragraph C, the writer indicates  that “Diamond thinks  they laid the moai on wooden sledges, hauled over log rails, but that required both a lot of wood and a lot of people.”

  • needed=required

 

  • a great deal of=a lot of

=>ANSWER: 24: wood

 

25 – 26. On what points do Hunt and Lipo disagree with Diamond?

Firstly, in paragraph C, Diamond assumes that “they (the Rapanui people) laid the moai on wooden sledges; hauled over log rails, but that required both a lot of wood and a lot of people.” But in paragraph E,Hunt and Lipo contend believe that “moving the moai required few people and no wood.” So, Hunt and Lipo disagree with Diamond about how the moai were transported. Secondly,  in  paragraph  C,  Diamond  thinks  that  the  moai  accelerated  the  destruction  of  the  island. Meanwhile, in paragraph F, “Hunt and Lipo are convinced that the settlers were not wholly responsible for the loss of the island‟s trees.” So, Hunt and Lipo disagree with Diamond about the impact of the moai on Rapanui society.

=>ANSWER: B-C

 



CAMBRIDGE IELTS 11 – TEST 2 – PASSAGE 3

 

 

Paragraph 1:  An emerging discipline….

Paragraph 2:  Could the same approach….

Paragraph 3:  Angelina Hawley-Dolan….

Paragraph 4:  Robert Pepperell….

Paragraph 5:  And what about artists….

Paragraph 6:  In a similar study….

Paragraph 7:  In another experiment….

Paragraph 8:  It is also intriguing….

Paragraph 9:  It‟s still early days….

 

27.In the second paragraph, the writer refers to a shape-matching test in order to illustrate

Keywords: shape-matching test, illustrate

In paragraph 2, the writer says that “We certainly do have an inclination to follow the crowd. When asked to make simple perceptual decisions such as matching a shape to its rotated image, for example, people often choose a definitively wrong answer if they see others doing the same.”            This  means  that  the  writer  refers  to  a  shape-

matching test in order to illustrate our tendency to be influenced by the opinions of others.

=>ANSWER: C

 

  1. Angelina Hawley-Dolan‟s findings indicate that people

Keywords: Angelina Hawley-Dolan‟s findings

In paragraph 3, Angelina Hawley-Dolan‟s experiment shows that “volunteers generally preferred the work of renowned artists, even when they believed it was by an animal or a child. It seems that the  viewers can sense the artists‟  vision  in  paintings,  even  if  they  can‟t  explain  why.”  So,  Angelina  Hawley-Dolan‟s  findings  indicate  that

people have the ability to perceive the intention behind works of art.

 

  • perceive the intention behind works of art=sense the artists‟ vision in paintings

=>ANSWER: D

 

  1. Results of studies involving Robert Pepperell‟s pieces suggest that people

Keywords: results of studies, Pepperell‟s pieces

At the end of paragraph 4, the writer argues that “It would seem that the brain sees these images as puzzles, and the  harder  it  is  to  decipher  the  meaning,  the  more  rewarding  is  the  moment  of  recognition.”  This  means  that results of studies involving Robert Pepperell‟s pieces suggest that people find it satisfying to work out what a painting

represents.

  • satisfying=rewarding
  • work out=decipher

 

  • what a painting means=the meaning

=>ANSWER: B

 

  1. What do the experiments described in the fifth paragraph suggest about the paintings of Mondrian?

Keywords: experiments, suggest, paintings of Mondrian

In the fifth paragraph, the writer indicates that “eye-tracking studies confirm that they (Mondrian‟s) works are meticulously composed, and that simply rotating a piece radically changes the way we view it.” This means that the paintings of Mondrian are more carefully put together than they appear.

  • experiments=studies

 

  • paintings=works
  • carefully=meticulously

 

  • be put together=be composed

=>ANSWER: A

 



31-33. Art and the Brain

  1. The discipline of neuroaesthetics aims to bring scientific objectivity to the study of art. Neurological studies of the brain, for example, demonstrate the impact which Impressionist paintings have on our…..

Keywords: the impact, Impressionist paintings have on our

In the first paragraph, the writer says that “The blurred imagery of Impressionist paintings seems to stimulate the brain‟s  amygdala, for instance. Since  the amygdala  plays  a crucial  role in our feelings, that  finding might explain why many people find these pieces so moving.” This means that Impressionist paintings have impact on our

feelings.

  •  emotions=feelings

=>ANSWER: C (emotions)

 

  1. Alex Forsythe of the University of Liverpool believes many artists give their works the precise degree of…..which most appeals to the viewer‟s brain.

Keywords: precise degree, appeals to the viewer‟s brain

In paragraph 7, the writer indicates that “In another experiment, Alex Forsythe of the University of Liverpool analysed the visual intricacy of different pieces of art, and her results suggest that many artist suse a key level of detail to please the brain. This means that Alex Forsythe believes many artists give their works the precise degree of

visual intricacy which most appeals to the viewer‟s brain.

  • complexity=intricacy

=>ANSWER: B (complexity)

 

 

  1. She  also  observes  that  pleasing  works  of  art  often  contain  certain  repeated…..which  occur  frequently  in  the

natural world.

Keywords: pleasing works of art, repeated

In paragraph 7, the writer argues that “What‟s more, appealing pieces both abstract and representational, show signs  of  „fractals‟-repeated  motifs  recurring  in  different  scales.  Fractals  are  common  throughout  nature,  for example in the shapes of mountain peaks of branches of trees. It is possible that our visual system, which evolved in

the great outdoors, finds it easier to process such patterns.” So, pleasing works of art often contain certain repeated motifs/ patterns which occur frequently in the natural world.

  • motifs=patterns=images

 

  •   pleasing=appealing
  • works of art=pieces

 

  • occur frequently=are common

 

  • in the natural world=throughout nature

=>ANSWER: H (images)

 

  1. Forsythe‟s findings contradicted previous beliefs on the function of „fractals‟ in art

Keywords: contradicted, previous beliefs

In paragraph 7 which details Forsythe‟s findings, the writer does not mentions whether her findings contradicted previous beliefs on the function of „fractals‟ in art. Although fractals are mentioned, this is only to explain what they are.  So, the statement is NOT GIVEN.

=>ANSWER: NOT GIVEN

 

  1. Certain ideas regarding the link between „mirror neurons‟ and art appreciation require further verification.

Keywords: link, mirror neurons, art appreciation, further verification

In paragraph 8, the writer says that “It is also intriguing that the brain appears to process movement when we see  a  handwritten  letter,  as  if  we  are  replaying  the  writer‟s  moment  of  creation.  This  has  led  some  to  wonder whether Pollock‟s works feel so dynamic because the brain reconstructs the energetic actions the artist used as he

painted.  This  may  be  down  to  our  brain‟s  „mirror  neurons‟,  which  are  known  to  mimic  others‟  actions.  The hypothesis will need to be thoroughly tested…”

  • require further verification= The hypothesis will need to be thoroughly tested

=>ANSWER: YES

 

  1. People‟s taste in paintings depends entirely on the current artistic trends of the period.

Keywords: taste, current artistic trends

At the end of paragraph 8, the writer indicates that “While the fashion of the time might shape what is currently popular, works that are best adapted to our visual system may be the most likely to linger once the trends of previous generations have been forgotten.”So, it is not true that people‟s taste in paintings depends entirely on the current

artistic trends of the period.

  • trend of the period=fashion of the time

=>ANSWER: NO

 

  1. Scientists should seek to define the precise rules which govern people‟s reactions to works of art.

Keywords: define precise rules, govern, reactions

In the last paragraph, the writer argues that “It would, however, be foolish to reduce art appreciation to set a set of  scientific laws.”  So, it  is  not  true  that  scientists  should  seek to  define the  precise  rules  which  govern  people‟s reactions to works of art.

  • rules=laws

 

  • people‟s reactions to works of art ~ art appreciation

=>ANSWER: NO

 

  1. Art appreciation should always involve taking into consideration the cultural context in which an artist worked.”

Keywords: always, cultural context

In  the  last  paragraph,  the  writer  says  that  “We  shouldn‟t  underestimate  the  importance  of  the  style  of  a particular artist, their place in history and the artistic environment of their time.”

=>ANSWER: YES

 

  1. It is easier to find meaning in the field of science than in that of art.

Keywords: easier, meaning in science, art

In  this  passage, the  writer does  not  mention this  information.  In  the last  paragraph,  art  and science  are only compared in terms of “looking for systems and decoding meaning so that we can view and appreciate the world in a new way”. So, the statement is NOT GIVEN.

=>ANSWER: NOT GIVEN

 

  1. What would be the most appropriate subtitle for the article?
  2. Some scientific insights into how the brain responds to abstract art.
  3. Recent studies focusing on the neural activity of abstract artists.
  4. A comparison of the neurological bases of abstract and representational art
  5. How brain research has altered public opinion about abstract art.

In this passage, the writer refers to some scientific experiments, theories and knowledge of the way the brain reacts to abstract art.   Neuroaesthectics are mentioned in paragraph 1 in the study of past masterpieces and then, in paragraph 2, the writer asks:  “Could the same approach also shed light on abstract twentieth-century pieces…?  The

rest  of  the article tries  to answer  this  question.   So, the most  appropriate subtitle for this  article is  some scientific insights into how the brain responds to abstract art.

  • insights=shed light on

=>ANSWER: A

 

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