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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Development of Public management theory

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Development of Public management theory

Development of Public management theory Bureaucracy management: The classic one A. Several theorists bridged the gap between strictly private and public sector management. One good example is Max Weber exploring sociologist, who explored the ideal bureaucracy in The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Bureaucratic Theory was developed by a German Sociologist and political economist Max Weber (1864-1920). According to him, bureaucracy is the most efficient form of organization. The organization has a well-defined line of authority. It has…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: Company Innovation

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: Company Innovation

Company Innovation A. In a scruffy office in midtown Manhattan, a team of 30 artificial intelligence programmers is trying to simulate the brains of an eminent sexologist, a well-known dietician, a celebrity fitness trainer and several other experts. Umagic Systems is a young firm, setting up websites that will allow clients to consult the virtual versions of these personalities. Subscribers will feed in details about themselves and their goals; Umagic‘s software will come up with the advice that the star…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: The Exploration of Mars

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: The Exploration of Mars

The Exploration of Mars A. In 1877, Giovanni Schiaparelli, an Italian astronomer, made drawings and maps of the Martian surface that suggested strange features. The images from telescopes at this time were not as sharp as today‘s. Schiaparelli said he could see a network of lines, or canali. In 1894, an American astronomer, Percival Lowell, made a series of observations of Mars from his own observations of Mars from his own observatory at Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. Lowell was convinced a…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: What are Dreams?

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: What are Dreams?

What are Dreams? A. Thousands of years ago, dreams were seen as messages from the gods, and in many cultures, they are still considered prophetic. In ancient Greece, sick people slept at the temples of Asclepius, the god of medicine, in order to receive dreams that would heal them. Modern dream science really begins at the end of the 19th century with Sigmund Freud, who theorized that dreams were the expression of unconscious desires often stemming from childhood. He believed…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Stealth Forces in weight Loss

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Stealth Forces in weight Loss

Stealth Forces in weight Loss The field of weight loss is like the ancient fable about the blind men and the elephant. Each man investigates a different part of the animal and reports back, only to discover their findings are bafflingly incompatible. A. The various findings by public-health experts, physicians, psychologists, geneticists, molecular biologists, and nutritionists are about as similar as an elephant‘s tusk is to its tail. Some say obesity is largely predetermined by our genes and biology; others…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Art in Iron and Steel

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: Art in Iron and Steel

Art in Iron and Steel A. Works of engineering and technology are sometimes viewed as the antitheses of art and humanity. Think of the connotations of assembly lines, robots, and computers. Any positive values there might be in such creations of the mind and human industry can be overwhelmed by the associated negative images of repetitive, stressful, and threatened jobs. Such images fuel the arguments of critics of technology even as they may drive powerful cars and use the Internet…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: The reconstruction of community in Talbot Park, Auckland

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: The reconstruction of community in Talbot Park, Auckland

The reconstruction of community in Talbot Park, Auckland A. An architecture of disguise is almost complete at Talbot Park in the heart of Auckland‘s Glen Innes. The place was once described as a state housing ghetto, rife with crime, vandalism and other social problems. But today after a $48 million urban renewal makeover, the site is home to 700 residents – 200 more than before – and has people regularly inquiring whether they can buy or rent there. “It doesn‘t…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: London Swaying Footbridge

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 2: London Swaying Footbridge

London Swaying Footbridge A. In September 1996 a competition was organized by the Financial Times in association with the London Borough of Southwark to design a new footbridge across the Thames. The competition attracted over 200 entries and was won by a team comprising Amp (engineers), Foster and Partners (architects) and the sculptor Sir Anthony Caro. B. The bridge opened to the public on 10 June 2000. Up to 100,000 people crossed it that day with up to 2000 people…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: TV Addiction 2

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 3: TV Addiction 2

TV Addiction 2 A. Excessive cravings do not necessarily involve physical substances. Gambling can become compulsive; sex can become obsessive. One activity, however, stands out for its prominence and ubiquity – the world‘s most popular pastime, television. Most people admit to having a love-hate relationship with it. They complain about the “boob tube” and “couch potatoes,” then they settle into their sofas and grab the remote control. Parents commonly fret about their children‘s viewing (if not their own). Even researchers…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Koalas

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Koalas

Koalas A. Koalas are just too nice for their own good. And except for the occasional baby taken by birds of prey, koalas have no natural enemies. In an ideal world, the life of an arboreal couch potato would be perfectly safe and acceptable. B. Just two hundred years ago, koalas flourished across Australia. Now they seem to be in decline, but exact numbers are not available as the species would not seem to be “under threat”. Their problem, however,…

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