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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Koalas

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Koalas

Koalas A. Koalas are just too nice for their own good. And except for the occasional baby taken by birds of prey, koalas have no natural enemies. In an ideal world, the life of an arboreal couch potato would be perfectly safe and acceptable. B. Just two hundred years ago, koalas flourished across Australia. Now they seem to be in decline, but exact numbers are not available as the species would not seem to be “under threat”. Their problem, however,…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Tea and Industrial Revolution

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Tea and Industrial Revolution

Tea and Industrial Revolution A. Alan Macfarlane thinks he could rewrite history. The professor of anthropological science at King‘s College, Cambridge has, like other historians, spent decades trying to understand the enigma of the Industrial Revolution. Why did this particular important event –the world-changing birth of industry – happen in Britain? And why did it happen at the end of the 18th century? B. Macfarlane compares the question to a puzzle. He claims that there were about 20 different factors…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The dugong: sea cow

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The dugong: sea cow

The dugong: sea cow Dugongs are herbivorous mammals that spend their entire lives in the sea. Their close relatives the manatees also venture into or live in fresh water. Together dugongs and manatees make up the order Sirenia or sea cows, sonamed because dugongs and manatees are thought to have given rise to the myth of the mermaids or sirens of the sea. A. The dugong, which is a large marine mammal which, together with the manatees, looks rather like…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The MAGIC of KEFIR

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The MAGIC of KEFIR

The MAGIC of KEFIR A    The shepherds of the North Caucasus region of Europe were only trying to transport milk the best way they knew how – in leather pouches strapped to the side of donkeys – when they made a significant discovery. A fermentation process would sometimes inadvertently occur en route, and when the pouches were opened up on arrival they would no longer contain milk but rather a pungent, effervescent, lowalcoholic substance instead. This unexpected development was…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Electroreception

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: Electroreception

Electroreception A    Open your eyes in sea water and it is difficult to see much more than a murky, bleary green colour. Sounds, too, are garbled and difficult to comprehend. Without specialised equipment humans would be lost in these deep sea habitats, so how do fish make it seem so easy? Much of this is due to a biological phenomenon known as electroreception – the ability to perceive and act upon electrical stimuli as part of the overall senses….

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: “For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack”

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: “For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack”

“For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack.” – Rudyard Kipling, The Law for the Wolves A wolf pack is an extremely well-organised family group with a well-defined social structure and a clear-cut code of conduct. Every wolf has a certain place and function within the pack and every member has to do its fair share of the work. The supreme leader is a very experienced wolf – the alpha…

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IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The Discovery of Penicillin

IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST PASSAGE 1: The Discovery of Penicillin

The Discovery of Penicillin   A The Scottish bacteriologist Dr Alexander Fleming (1881-1955) is credited with the discovery of penicillin in London in 1928. He had been working at St Mary’s Hospital on thebacteriology of septic wounds. As a medic during World War I, he had witnessed the deaths of many wounded soldiers from infection and he had observed that the use of harsh antiseptics, rather than healing the body, actually harmed the blood corpuscles that destroy bacteria. B In…

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